Thursday, September 25, 2014

Two DIY Geometric Concrete Projects {Sister Inspirations}

Hello, friends! We are excited to be back with a Sister Inspirations post again after our long hiatus.

This month we have been crushing on lots of geometric objects, so we decided to create our own. We chose concrete for our material because of its great modern, industrial vibe. Concrete is also surprisingly easy to work with and very inexpensive. The mix costs less than $5 and we hardly used much of the bag for our little projects.


Megan created a beautiful, diamond-shaped planter and I made a small gilded bowl.

We also have the templates for you to download so that you can easily make your own!

I chose to make a small bowl that I could have on my desk or bedside table to hold small objects like paper clips or the day’s jewelry. A hexagon forms the base of the bowl, but its sides are not quite perfectly the same to give it a little unexpected whimsy.



You’ll need: 

Quikrete concrete mix, a sheet of photo paper, packing tape, a printer, scissors, Vaseline, and a plastic cup. We accidentally bought the commercial grade Quikrete, which was completely unnecessary, but it still worked.


Process:

1. Print out the template on photo paper.

2. Cut it out and tape up the sides well with packing tape.

3. Coat the inside of the paper with Vaseline.

diy concrete mold template.png

4. Take out any large rock pieces from the concrete mix.

5. Mix the Quikrete with a little bit of water at a time, until you have the consistency of thick pancake batter.

6. Pour concrete into your mold, place cup in the mix to the desired depth to form the inside shape of the bowl, and let it set until it seems solid but not completely set. Around 18 hours.

7. Peel off the paper, remove cup, and continue to let it cure. It should be fully cured after 24 or more hours.



My bowl was beautiful just as it was in plain concrete, but I decided to take it up a notch and paint the inside with metallic gold paint.

Be sure to check out Megan's pretty planter over at A Little Nutmeg. You'll be able to download the template for the planter there.



Linking up to "Inspire Me Please" link party at Love of Family and Home.


11 comments:

  1. I feel like I have missed some posts since my life has gotten crazy! So glad I saw this and got caught up on all your awesome ideas! Love your blog!!!

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  2. Really LOOVE these projects --had one question about cups to hold form in middle???

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    1. I just pressed the bottom of a regular plastic solo cup into the wet concrete mix to form the inside depression for my bowl, but you can use something else as long as it was around the right size. Does that answer your question?

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    2. Absolutely! And, I actually completed this project with a different medium I had! I will share on my Instagram and my blog this week linking to credit you of course! Thank you SOO much for sharing this becuase it was simple, had room for error, and still had an amazing geometric result :D TY

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  4. I understand the whole process and really want to try this but am confused on how you got the geometric outline to use as a mold.

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    1. We got the geometric outline from using the paper template. If you just download the template in the post, print it out, then cut, fold, and tape it up, you'll get your geometric form. I hope that helps!

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  5. Do you have to use photo paper or would regular printing paper work too? Also would cardstock work?

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    1. Regular paper wouldn't work because it would be too thin to keep it's shape once you add the concrete mix. We used photo paper because it's thicker plus it has an extra coating that helps it not absorb as much moisture from the concrete mix. Card stock might work because it's thicker, but since I've never tried it, I can't guarantee it will. If you try it, let me know how it works out!

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  6. Can I substitute an actual concrete for the Quikrete?

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    1. I'm sure you can. We chose the quikrete because it was easy to work with and had a finer texture so that the details of the shapes came out better. Regular concrete might work, but the edges might not be as clean.

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I'd love to hear what you have to say. All comments that are kind, helpful, and relevant are welcome.